LBPSB’s Strategic Promotion Project: Opening New Career Paths

by Andrew Henry

The Strategic Promotion Project (SPP) is an initiative of LBPSB’s Continuing Education Department. It is designed to help expand the adult and vocational sectors by building partnerships with community groups.

SPP

Because these groups support the integration of refugees and immigrants, the strategy is to partner with them and to share as much information as possible to facilitate their access to continuing education programs thereby providing them with additional options for a new career.

“This initiative is extremely important. Many people aren’t aware of the many programs the LBPSB offers, nor do they know that they are free.  We offer learners from all backgrounds the opportunity of a successful career in a variety of fields,” says Andrew Henry, the superintendent who oversees the project.

“Building various partnerships with cultural groups and communities allows adult education and vocational programs extra visibility and the opportunity to present our offering to people who may not be aware,” says Andrew.

Study Looks at Ways to Improve Low Graduation Rates

A 2018 study of the Institut du Quebec concluded that only 64% of Quebec public high school students graduate. The overall percentage rose to 69% when private school students were factored-in. The study also concluded that one third of students who enter secondary school do not graduate within the regular five years. The success percentage rises to 80% when students are given an additional two years.

This study demonstrates the need for targeted initiatives to better support high school students to graduate on time.

It’s important to reinforce that students who obtain a DEP certificate are considered graduates by the Ministry of Education and that the certificate can be accepted as experience in certain fields.

“When I present to these groups, my goal is to strengthen engagement and help them better understand the different educational options that exist in the adult and vocational sectors,” says Andrew. “Many cultural groups are isolated, but my hope is to educate them and help them choose an educational path that can help them build a career in Canada.”

Leave a Reply